2013 1107 Did Super Typhoon Haiyan Just Shatter The Global Hurricane Intensity Record?

 

November 7, 2013

Did Super Typhoon Haiyan Just Shatter The Global Hurricane Intensity Record?

Just another weather record falling, this one, however, is major.  -Scott

http://www.motherjones.com/blue-marble/2013/11/did-super-typhoon-haiyan-just-shatter-global-hurricane-intensity-record

By at least one measurement, it appears that Super Typhoon Haiyan, which just slammed into the Philippine island of Samar, may be the strongest storm reliably recorded on Earth. Additional measurements and analysis will surely be necessary to confirm this, but for now, here’s what we know:

The U.S. Navy’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center, which tracks typhoons and Super Typhoons—the most powerful storms on the planet—estimated Haiyan’s maximum 1-minute sustained winds at 170 knots, which translates into about 195 miles per hour.

According to meteorologist Jeff Masters, a number of Pacific storms prior to 1969 were measured with wind speeds equal to or above 170 knots, but these estimates are now considered unreliable. Since 1969, the three strongest storms on record by wind speed all had winds of 165 knots, or 190 miles per hour: 1979’s Super Typhoon Tip, 1969’s Atlantic Hurricane Camille, and 1980’s Atlantic Hurricane Allen. Haiyan just passed all three by this metric, though Masters notes that there is less confidence in Haiyan’s true intensity, since Tip, Camille, and Allen were all investigated by hurricane hunter aircraft. Haiyan’s intensity has only been estimated based on satellite images (you can read more about how these satellite measurements are done, and why Haiyan presented such a stunning satellite image, in this great New Republic article by Nate Cohn).

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