Satellite Imagery (Part 1)

October 27, 2004, 23:30Z/4:30pm Pacific

This was record-breaking soaker of a storm replete with waterspouts off the Southland coast not long ago. Do you see the numerous acceleration tracks pushing the storm eastward, then northeastward once you get into western Arizona?
Tracks also adding additional spin and directional control in eastern Clark county Nevada. I am amazed that the weather
industry is so ignorant of all this unnatural activity!

October 17 th 2004, 2215Z/415pm Local SE Idaho/N Utah

A big, diagonal, clear zone where the sky has been cleared of clouds. One look at this image and there is no question that something is acting on the weather. And I’ve already gotten grief for calling for rain showers and then we sit underneath this hole while the rain passes to either side. I’am telling this story because I don’t like missing a forecast! Especially when I wasn’t wrong!

Looking up from below it was obvious that something just isn’t right with the clouds. So let’s look at it from another point of view. The obvious choice was satellite imagery. I have a few options readily available to me at work, however, all proved wholly inadequate. Which is why most weathermen remain oblivious. Resolution was poor just 1 km per pixel at best in the visible spectrum; it gets even worse in the infrared and water vapor. 4km is the best available at those wavelengths. So I went shopping!

High-resolution nationwide visible imagery is for sale at Weathertap.com. The limitations are that I have to save each image every 15 minutes as they become available from GOES-10 and 12. No archiving, if you miss the quarter hour image, it is gone forever! Visible imagery only works during daylight hours, obviously so much of the day is then unavailable to me during the low light seasons. Less work is the upside!

Signatures of weapon use are surprisingly varied, holes punched out of storms, square ripples stimulating thunderstorm development, tractor tracks accelerating and changing the direction of surface and upper wind currents, and more. This is just a taste of what is going in plain sight of all.

Oct 12, 2004 1500Z Southern California

A small cut-off low drifting westward off the coast displays an eye! Over the mountains of Southern California the clouds just don’t act normal. Look closely and see what oddities, triangles, fans, squares, and crosses can you spot.

Sept 25, 2004 1900Z SE Iowa

I challenge anybody familiar with fluid dynamics would have a tough time explaining this joining of clouds.

October 2, 2004 2045Z Eastern Nebraska Western Iowa

Normal, natural… Not even!

June 13, 2004 2353Z Kansas/Nebraska/Colorado

Straight edge clouds running at 90-degrees to each other. Other cloud frequency variations are evident if you really want to look.

Oct 4, 2004 2032Z Eastern Lakes Region

Too many straight lines running across terrain that should have an effect of on the clouds next to the atmospheric boundary
layer. This set-up occurs frequently after a cold front moves through the northeastern US/Canada. The oddest clouds, the
most altered clouds, are found under the westerlies-the steering currents that drive our weather at these latitudes.

Early Evening 6 June 2004

June 7, 2004–0108Z Southern Montana/East Idaho/NW Montana

This image was huge for me. Finally convincing me that this project wasn’t limited to individual ‘events’ but
was everywhere all the time. Soak up all the oddities, squares, and clouds at 90-degree angles. the whole storm had to have
been digitized into individual cells. I’ve never looked at the sky the same since.

Sept 12, 2004-1945Z Southern Ontario

Nice circle in the middle of the frame and a half-circle just to the southeast. how is this done naturally?

October 22, 2004 1930Z 2:30pm Central

A nice hole inside a double square!

November 4, 2004 2015Z 4:15 Eastern

I have pointed out a variety of scalar impressions on the cloud cover in the above image. By looking at each, you can then see how many I didn’t point out! Now can you see why I can say that the entire atmospheric process has been entirely digitized!